history, politics

The Heart of Political Division – Part 6

To understand the platform of conservatives, it’s important to understand their unifying factor: the Republican Party. Recall in my previous post how this was shaped by the Democratic presidents leading up to that point. For Republicans, the political platform had revolved around a capitalistic economic ideology predating President Herbert Hoover and tracing its roots back to its very formation.

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history, politics

The Heart of Political Division – Part 5

And now we begin an exploration of conservatism and why it is what it is today. For that, we need to look at the most pivotal point in modern American political history and its background.

It was March 31, 1968, towards the end of the bloody Vietnam war when a shocking announcement was made that called out and inadvertently declared the ending of American political unity. While the tensions in the months preceding the announcement were evident and the collapse of the American political system into liberal and conservative parties may have seemed inevitable, it was the presidency that had held the nation together.

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global issues, media, psychology

National Symptoms, Invisible Causes

Suppose you have an nagging person in your life. They bug you, they irritate you, but they never hit you. Now and then they mock you. If you respond to them in anger, it may start a greater argument, and you might end up being the one criticized by others even though all you wanted to do was defend yourself. Still, if you do nothing, the problem within you only gets worse until you become very angry.

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global issues, psychology

“Right” is not the right idea

An analogy I often use to demonstrate the term “rhetoric” is to say “ice cubes are cool, therefore ice cubes are awesome”. What is going on here is the alteration of an idea based on the abstracting of an original idea. Certainly ice cubes can be awesome, and the appreciation of ice cubes being cool makes them awesome (subjectively speaking), but the coolness alone does not make the ice cube awesome. Yet this change in an idea often goes unnoticed when the word attempts to describe a more complex framework. In short, we may find ourselves applying rhetoric without even realizing it. The word we are actually searching for may be more limited in scope and definition but be supported by reality. Let us start with an analogy.

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