architecture and interior design

Japanese firm designs lounge to accommodate smokers

This week, by accident, I discovered a Japanese architecture and interior design firm that has created a design for allowing smokers and non-smokers to lounge together in comfort. The firm is called “nonscale”. Their plan, which can be viewed here, uses pyramid-shaped vents for controlling airflow.

I’m not certain the idea will work in practice. Smoke tends to spread out, not just float up. I wonder if they plan on using quiet fans. Smoking isn’t good for your health, but the habit does spark some interesting design challenges, no?

今週、私はたまたま、喫煙者と非喫煙者が快適で一緒にいられるラウンジの設計を作った日本の建築の会社を見つけた。この会社は「nonscale」と言う。この会社の設計は、こちらで、四角錐の通気口がある。

この設計は実際に効くかと思わない。煙は上だけになく広かって漂う傾向する。この会社は静かな扇風機を使うつもりだかな。喫煙の癖は健康を害すけど、面白い設計の難関を導入するな。

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blog milestones, this blog

Blog Changes 2018

It’s about that time again, everyone. Time for some changes! I started this blog just over 6 years ago in February. I had nothing to write about then. I just wanted a try writing a blog again after my first one felt like a flop. Now I have more to write about than I have time for, so my blog lay alone for other reasons. Now I’m adding more reasons to that, haha.

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media, music, remix

ArtCore and the New East Asian Beats

Every now and then, you stumble on something amazing. I like hearing ethereal, epic, Japanese-sounding music, so while checking out some recommendations on Youtube, I learned about an awesome “new” genre of music made possible by a collage of global influences and technological inventions (a long way of saying “synth” and “drum machine”). Introducing “artcore“. Of course, I’m alittle behind in the labeling because there’s quite a bit of this stuff, supposedly starting in 2004 with Narcissus at Oasis by Ryu but finally jumping the ocean enough after a decade to stand out on its own.

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Japanese, language

Japanese They Don’t Teach in Class

If you’re new to Japanese, you’ll find it very disconcerting that there is a huge gap between beginner Japanese and expert. Not only that, “beginner” Japanese in text books and classes is polite Japanese – verbs that have already been modified so that if you ever visit Japan, you speak pleasantly. Furthermore – and here’s the real kicker – speech is much harder to understand than it first seems, and watching anime and listening to music will only help you to a certain extent. In this post, I hope to cover a few details about Japanese, including the learning process, that should ease your pain.

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