art, freeware, software

Setting up JWildfire as a Project in NetBeans

In this tutorial, I’m going to show you how to set up JWildfire in the NetBeans IDE so you can edit the software in one of the best Java IDEs available. This will allow you to make custom variations of your own without having to use the custom_wf variation.

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freeware, software

UltraGUI – Window Management for Irrlicht

In today’s world, there’s this subtle quest of designers and programmers to find the ultimate GUI layout – something that always works and everyone can use with ease. When a design is bad, someone gets an earful. When it’s decent, no one minds it as much, though people are nit-picky. When a design is good… well, let’s face it – no one has the same tastes.

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Software Embarrassment #1 – It’s a Paint Job

For quite some time, I’ve struggled with the fact that most work I find out there is always more professional or quality than mine (even if mine looks better or works better, there’s some mystique about professional work that always makes me more critical of my work). You might have this issue to, but hey – it’s good to be your best critic. Most work you see out there you might think, “Shoot, I can do that, can’t I?” But on some rare occasion, you might stumble on some whose work is publicly marketed and you think, “… Uh… That’s EMBARRASSING!” (Okay, maybe not that loudly.)

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Blast from the Past – LEGO website in 1996

Remember the days when websites were pages of just solid, repeated backgrounds with buttons that were cheap gif images. You know – back when gif images were cool. Think back, before the days of CSS 2, back when you still had to type in “www.” at the front of the URL, back when people knew NetZero existed, back when “You’ve got mail” could be trademarked by AOL, WAY back, when the internet was young and I was just a wee lad playing with Legos.

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business, software, web design

Separating Your Work and Private Website

Recently I spoke with an undisclosed individual about the job market… and of course, about websites.

The consensus with employers is always this: separate your professional side from your private life. That’s definitely good advice. No one wants to hear about your drinking problem or the fact that your like to play with imported machine guns and spit fire at Mardi Gras festivals. And yet…

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