Christianity, global issues, history, politics, religion and spiritualism

“In God We Trust” – Reflections on Tiananmen Square

June 4, 1989, the communist government of China mercilessly massacred countless people (hundreds, thousands, and even 10,000, according to Sir Alan Donald), including students, residents, and even other soldiers. The events serve as a seemingly timeless testimony to the brutality of authoritarian regimes who fulfill the predictions of Orwell’s 1984 and is remembered in films like Black Night in June by Arther Kent (youtube: watch?v=hA4iKSeijZI ).

Yet the sheer reality of those horrors has escaped the minds of common individuals, even in democratic nations, where policemen argue they need facial recognition software and cameras and the legislative branch of the US government still permits the needless bulk collection of everyone’s internet communications by the NSA, all for “security” (whose?). After the Bolshevik revolution, communism became taboo in the US with the J.E. Hoover FBI squashing resistance for decades. Consequently, it has been rebranded as “social reform” and socialist policies (F.D.R., J.F.K., L.B.J. and such presidents). It’s easy to argue for idealistic systems, but people forget that when anything is put in practice, the one variable causing all of the problems hasn’t been fixed: the wickedness of a human. That brings us to an interesting point.

Standing and watching the real events take place were three “gods”. The first was the communist state, the self-proclaimed god that dictated the lives of the people. The second was the “Goddess of Democracy”, a statue constructed by the students of the protest (which survived, or perhaps as a replica). The third was the real God.

Each of these “gods” was in some way part of the events, and each one called out for action.

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Poverty Is Not Such a Bad Thing

When people think of the word “poverty”, it usually has negative connotations. You might think of starving children in Africa or the slums of Calcutta. The idea that people have in mind is that one has less than one needs. But even more important, a person has less than he or she wants. When we relabel the word as “simplistic life” or “minimalism”, it is viewed in a more positive light because it is a choice. And yet, there is something very akin to this minimalism while still being entirely within the realm of poverty; it’s what the religious call “holy poverty”. But before I get into what that means for the religious, let me first address what it simply means to humans in general.

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