art, comics and manga, media

ClipStudio Paint vs Krita

Some time ago, I made comparisons between different types of art software available. I compared Krita and Gimp, then I compared Krita and PaintToolSAI. Now it’s time to look at what the pros use. I’ll begin with procedure, explain the gaps in free software, and then discuss how ClipStudio Paint fills in those gaps. Finally, I’ll throw in alittle bit about what I think of Toon Boon Harmony.

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art, freeware, software

Is Krita better than Gimp?

The Gimp is arguably the most popular free software for non-vector digital art and image editing. (Inkscape is the best free program for vector graphics in my opinion.) Some time ago, I analyzed Paint Tool SAI, comparing it with the Gimp, and the results are in. But SAI has an unrelated, nay, a mirror image in the FOSS world trying to do what SAI does in a better way: Krita. Krita is a cross-platform open-source free software tool for digital art. In fact, I’d argue that, in light of what Krita has to offer, Gimp may be considered the best for image editing and not for art creation. But here’s a run-down comparison of the two.

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art, software, web design

Ripping 3D Models from Websites

Anyone who explores the internet long enough should already be well aware of frequent image re-posting. While for some things, this is acceptable, in other areas, it leads to the ever louder cry of “art theft” and helps keep the lawyers active in the courts in D.C. and the halls of the copyright office. It is rather easy to copy a 2D image, and with Adobe CS 6, it is easy to remove a watermark. While images with watermarks removed may not be an exact copy (due to the algorithm for image correction and the style of watermark), the average naked eye won’t notice. But what’s more important is that a work with possibly a great deal of time put into its production (depending on if we’re talking about amateur photo or something like a realistic digital painting, etc.) is now available to everyone, and unfortunately, allows for just about anyone to take the credit. This tends to tick off artists and has lead to a whole lot of bickering and lawsuits.

Interestingly enough, what one might call the “calamities of Flatland” have yet to hit the 3D world. But here’s how that could change…

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art, psychology, religion and spiritualism

On Viewing People

As a young child growing up, the world is new, and that’s probably the closest most people will ever be to seeing things how they truly are in an objective – as opposed to subjective – sense. That is not to say they will not view things in a subjective sense, only that this is as close as they will be to both the objective perspective and to the unbiased perspective. I refer specifically to the earliest of ages, before one has enough experience to have an opinion.

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How Julia transforms work

Last night, I quickly put together a video about how Julia transforms work in iterated function series flames. By “Julia”, I mean julian, juliaq, julia3D, julia3Dz, etc. – The transforms in JWildfire labeled with “julia” (except salamander and one other, I think). I know Apophysis has many of these as well.

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art, fractal, freeware, software

Chaotica vs JWildfire Rendering

If you’re a fractal artist, you might be aware of a few popular programs for fractal art, including JWildfire and the up-and-coming Chaotica. JWildfire is almost a fractal creation suite, an all-in-one package that allows you to not only make fractals, but watch them dance to music and make videos with them. Chaotica, on the other hand, can’t do much functionally but is an excellent program for rendering… assuming you can figure out how to get the thing to work for you.

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