software

Shimeji and Your Friendly Desktop Characters

desktop-chibi

It probably doesn’t cross people’s minds to have some strange character sitting (or even moving) on their computer desktop. You don’t need it. It’s purely for entertainment. If you ever want it though, it’s hard to find.

The idea of desktop characters is a cute one. Naturally, then the Japanese must have this. They call them “shimeji” (though if you try to look up that word, you will find it refers to mushrooms).

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freeware, software

Installing Gitless from source code

Git receives a lot of flack for having a poorly created UI on top of a technological monster. Underneath the hood, it may be a beast of an engine, but the user gets to use a 5-in-1 for its keys. Gitless is a convenient hood, but there’s only one catch: all the binaries you can download are 64-bit which means… compiling from source for those of us running 32-bit Linux operating systems.

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freeware, software

Restoring the File Explorer Appearance on Linux Mint (no more ’98 look)

If you’ve played with Linux Mint long enough, you’ll eventually become aware of a rather annoying issue when browsing files: At some seemingly random point, you may hear a sweet bell sound (no kidding) and your file browser/explorer suddenly looks ugly. i.e. Your folders have these antiquated-looking tan appearance and the nav panel looks like something out of Windows 98… (maybe not quite that bad, but you get the idea). There’s a way to get those shiny green folders back, and here’s how I did it… without restarting the OS.

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art, freeware, software

Is Krita better than Gimp?

The Gimp is arguably the most popular free software for non-vector digital art and image editing. (Inkscape is the best free program for vector graphics in my opinion.) Some time ago, I analyzed Paint Tool SAI, comparing it with the Gimp, and the results are in. But SAI has an unrelated, nay, a mirror image in the FOSS world trying to do what SAI does in a better way: Krita. Krita is a cross-platform open-source free software tool for digital art. In fact, I’d argue that, in light of what Krita has to offer, Gimp may be considered the best for image editing and not for art creation. But here’s a run-down comparison of the two.

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software

Creating Projects with Irrlicht and Premake

~ Table of Contents ~

  1. Introduction
  2. What is Premake?
  3. Initial Steps
    1. File Format
    2. Your Project File Structure
    3. Creating Needed Objects
  4. A Little About Lua
  5. Setting up a Premake Project
  6. Setting up Irrlicht
  7. Putting It All Together
  8. Additional Notes

You are free to copy, modify (if necessary for maintenance), and share this article as much as you wish, but I make no guarantee of the accuracy of anything herein. This clause is primarily intended for wikis.

~ Introduction ~

Irrlicht is a free, zlib-style-licensed 3D engine, having its own built-in engines as well as acting as a wrapper for OpenGL and DirectX. It is tailored primarily towards speed (and thus, gaming) and is relatively easy to modify.

If you’re a new C or C++ programmer, you may have heard of “Make” and “CMake”. Make is a program on Linux distros that sends commands to the compiler for how to.. well, make a program executable. CMake is supposedly the cross-platform version of “make” in that it creates make files for different operating systems. However, I’ve heard complaints that it’s a mess, and it just adds to the work. In steps Premake…

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freeware, software

Restoring The Menu Panel on Linux Mint Cinnamon

I got back into using Linux Mint Cinnamon not too long ago (Good bye, Windows! Hello, Mint 17) (the installation on a computer with NVidia I should write about since that’s it’s own fun mess), but like any piece of complicated software, it has its bugs. One of the more annoying bugs is when the menu panel / menu bar on the bottom (equivalent to Window’s Task Bar) just so happens to lose all of its text and icons…

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