art, fractal, software

Faster Fractal Flame Rendering

My astute readers may note I have written a more complete description of the actual algorithm for fractal flames in another article. This article is more about improvements to the general process in the software for rendering fractal flames.

Preface

Having been creating fractals for a number of years, I have grown considerably interested in making software that allows me to create these structures. Not considering CPU vs GPU, there are a couple of common approaches, and I have had the pleasure of trying them all out. After toying with various software and examining their inner mechanisms, I’m now familiar with how each of these programs render fractals.

Addiction to creating fractals can be a blessing and a curse. On the one hand, you are creating the most liberal art in the universe – pure color and shape – without so much as a single relation to a controversial topic. On the other hand, the artwork never provides complete gratification. It drives you to want to see more and more (and spend hours on end rendering it). The fine details are the main attraction and the source of endless entertainment.

There is an enormous potential in fractal design, and I’d like to see it manifested. However, fractal creation can be inherently slow or spotty in appearance depending on the type of fractal being rendered and the software used. Out of disappointment, I’ve pondered the details of the process and how to improve it. What follows in this article is an overview of those thoughts and an analysis of some of the solutions I’ve been dreaming up.

Continue reading

Advertisements
anime and games, media, software, tech news and opinions, tv

Animation Production in 3D – Part 2

In my previous article, I spoke about the charm of 2D animation and gave an overview on how efforts using 3D technology have struggled to replicate it. In this post, I’m going to talk about current technology and the direction of technology that will allow for production of better animation, especially anime style.

Continue reading

anime and games, media, software, tech news and opinions, tv

Animation Production in 3D – Part 1

Despite everything I said in my previous post, I am now going to write on a topic that would be of interest to people in Japan, and even more ironic, I’m going to type in on the computer because it’s one of those topics I can ramble on without being too picky about my words. See how that works? Alrighty, let’s get started.

The topic of today: The current and future technology that will be powering the production of animation as well as it’s effects on the overall quality of the said product. Since I am a technical kind of guy and this is my line of work, I’ll be giving you some fascinating insider details. (Hint, hint, that means a long blog post.)

Continue reading

software

Shimeji and Your Friendly Desktop Characters

desktop-chibi

It probably doesn’t cross people’s minds to have some strange character sitting (or even moving) on their computer desktop. You don’t need it. It’s purely for entertainment. If you ever want it though, it’s hard to find.

The idea of desktop characters is a cute one. Naturally, then the Japanese must have this. They call them “shimeji” (though if you try to look up that word, you will find it refers to mushrooms).

Continue reading

freeware, software

Installing Gitless from source code

Git receives a lot of flack for having a poorly created UI on top of a technological monster. Underneath the hood, it may be a beast of an engine, but the user gets to use a 5-in-1 for its keys. Gitless is a convenient hood, but there’s only one catch: all the binaries you can download are 64-bit which means… compiling from source for those of us running 32-bit Linux operating systems.

Continue reading

freeware, software

Restoring the File Explorer Appearance on Linux Mint (no more ’98 look)

If you’ve played with Linux Mint long enough, you’ll eventually become aware of a rather annoying issue when browsing files: At some seemingly random point, you may hear a sweet bell sound (no kidding) and your file browser/explorer suddenly looks ugly. i.e. Your folders have these antiquated-looking tan appearance and the nav panel looks like something out of Windows 98… (maybe not quite that bad, but you get the idea). There’s a way to get those shiny green folders back, and here’s how I did it… without restarting the OS.

Continue reading