religion and spiritualism

Liturgical New Years

Happy New Years, everyone! Tis the year my seasonal articles seem all out of order, but at least there’s some rhyme and reason to it.

Today is the beginning of Advent, the time of waiting. In the Catholic Church, it is a new liturgical year. For most Catholics, that means changing of the liturgy books. For Protestants, it means nothing. For a long time, I hadn’t ever thought about this being the “new year”. It’s usually been “this is the start of the Christmas season”, which actually started the day after Thanksgiving. Talking with people and reflecting on the meaning of the birth of Christ has finally started to turn things around for some of my fellow Christians and me.

Today really is the beginning of the new year. The church celebrates the coming of Christ and, at the same time, as we read the prophecies of old and the foretelling by the Christ, we look forward to Him coming again. “Be vigilant” is the word of the year. Be ready for his coming.

This year, looking at today as a new year, it feels more like I’m launching into something new, and that my Christmas is the beginning of something exciting and invigorating rather than being the book-end to the old year, which I’d rather forget.

There’s plenty of time to make new year resolutions, but whether you pick today or the coming celebration in 28 days, don’t let it be merely for the sake of a “new year”.

And lastly, don’t bother checking this blog on “New Years Day”, ’cause I probably will not have written anything then… as if I write much now, haha.

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global issues, history, psychology, religion and spiritualism

The Modern European God

Not too long ago, medical and European ethics entered the global spotlight when a boy named Charlie was denied experimental treatment that had a possible chance to cure him. Since the boy was too little to decide for himself, the parents were attempting to take action. However, the state denied their request for treatment and even went so far as to deny them the opportunity to see their child.

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art, psychology, religion and spiritualism

On Viewing People

As a young child growing up, the world is new, and that’s probably the closest most people will ever be to seeing things how they truly are in an objective – as opposed to subjective – sense. That is not to say they will not view things in a subjective sense, only that this is as close as they will be to both the objective perspective and to the unbiased perspective. I refer specifically to the earliest of ages, before one has enough experience to have an opinion.

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