global issues, politics

The Line for Government

Assume we have three people: one with a big mouth, one who doesn’t say anything, and one with a gun. Who gets to control the situation? I think it’s fairly obvious that there’s a kind of pecking order here. The big mouth will exert influence over the living status of the silent people, but the person with the gun will get the final word if and when they want it.

Despite this being a very simple example, it applies regardless of scale, albeit the more people that are involved, the more difficult it is for the guys with the guns to enforce their will… at least at a moment’s notice.

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Christianity, global issues, philosophy, psychology, religion and spiritualism

The Most Anticipated Online Interview of 2019 Has Arrived: Peterson – Barron

Audio below.

Bishop Robert Barron is a Catholic ministerial priest who has set out on a quest to show the legitimacy and relevance of authentic Catholic Christian teaching in people’s lives.

Jordan B. Peterson is a clinical psychologist from the University of Toronto.

The two of them have made significant ripples in the water, attracting audiences of millions – both religious and non-religious, Catholic, atheist, Buddhist, Muslim, Protestant, and so on – for their remarkable insights and thought-provoking arguments on the human condition.

Followers of both men have encouraged the two great minds to meet and have a dialogue, so in March of this year, Jordan Peterson interviewed Bishop Barron for his podcast. The result was nearly two hours of polite, fantastic intellectual conversation… and the potential for more.

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Christianity, global issues, history, politics, religion and spiritualism

“In God We Trust” – Reflections on Tiananmen Square

June 4, 1989, the communist government of China mercilessly massacred countless people (hundreds, thousands, and even 10,000, according to Sir Alan Donald), including students, residents, and even other soldiers. The events serve as a seemingly timeless testimony to the brutality of authoritarian regimes who fulfill the predictions of Orwell’s 1984 and is remembered in films like Black Night in June by Arther Kent (youtube: watch?v=hA4iKSeijZI ).

Yet the sheer reality of those horrors has escaped the minds of common individuals, even in democratic nations, where policemen argue they need facial recognition software and cameras and the legislative branch of the US government still permits the needless bulk collection of everyone’s internet communications by the NSA, all for “security” (whose?). After the Bolshevik revolution, communism became taboo in the US with the J.E. Hoover FBI squashing resistance for decades. Consequently, it has been rebranded as “social reform” and socialist policies (F.D.R., J.F.K., L.B.J. and such presidents). It’s easy to argue for idealistic systems, but people forget that when anything is put in practice, the one variable causing all of the problems hasn’t been fixed: the wickedness of a human. That brings us to an interesting point.

Standing and watching the real events take place were three “gods”. The first was the communist state, the self-proclaimed god that dictated the lives of the people. The second was the “Goddess of Democracy”, a statue constructed by the students of the protest (which survived, or perhaps as a replica). The third was the real God.

Each of these “gods” was in some way part of the events, and each one called out for action.

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global issues, language, philosophy, politics, science

On the Definition and Usage of Words

1. Philosophical Underpinnings

As a fledging apologist, my earliest experiences in the debate sector led me to frustration with people who couldn’t quite see the argument I was trying to make. They would often misinterpret and misunderstand what I had to say, taking ideas and twisting them. It seemed we had no common ground, so I endeavored to find that common ground – some set of ideas we ALL know are true. With such a common ground, I would hopefully be able to prove my points.

One of the first things I did was try to define words. In highschool, I read Socrates, and one of his famous lines that I took to heart was “the beginning of wisdom is the definition of terms”. What Socrates found was that people never really had a clear definition of anything, and thus no one really seemed to know what they were talking about. However, as I tried to come up with some philosophical terminology for defining words, I found the whole endeavor fruitless and meaningless. The truth was, words on their own had no exact definition.

That’s an important conclusion that can be and is very often misinterpreted. The underlying problem was that I was trying to find something “exact” and “specific”, defined in terms of words. But defining words in terms of words is philosophically identical to the problem of putting a rigid box into an identical copy of itself.

However, you’re reading this right now, which says that words are not as arbitrary as they seem. Let’s talk about that.

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global issues

Notre Dame and The Fall of the Spire

In case you haven’t checked the news yet, there was a horrific fire at Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris that has the world “in tears”, but for different reasons.

Notre Dame fire: dramatic video captures moment the spire collapsed

https://twitter.com/globalnews/status/1117997098874613760

While it’s quite early to be making sharp comments, I wanted to remark on the ironies. Europe is in love with the shell of its tradition. It loves its old cathedrals, its museums, its “histories”, and its “humanitarianism”. It wants to hang on to these things, and it seems to remember all about where they came from – or at least it remembers where the buildings come from. But it has no interest in maintaining the core. Last I heard, no one was going to mass (a Catholic service) in Notre Dame. It could be said that the casualties were only a single firefighter, but I think it’s more accurate to say that up to this point, the casualties consisted of all of France.

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global issues, media, psychology

National Symptoms, Invisible Causes

Suppose you have an nagging person in your life. They bug you, they irritate you, but they never hit you. Now and then they mock you. If you respond to them in anger, it may start a greater argument, and you might end up being the one criticized by others even though all you wanted to do was defend yourself. Still, if you do nothing, the problem within you only gets worse until you become very angry.

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global issues, history, psychology, religion and spiritualism

The Modern European God

Not too long ago, medical and European ethics entered the global spotlight when a boy named Charlie was denied experimental treatment that had a possible chance to cure him. Since the boy was too little to decide for himself, the parents were attempting to take action. However, the state denied their request for treatment and even went so far as to deny them the opportunity to see their child.

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