architecture and interior design, education, psychology

Costless Creativity

Today has been quite inspiring for a number of reasons, but the fun started happening with a really good (albeit 10+ year old) TED Talk by Ken Robinson regarding creativity and education. As you may well know with internet exploration, I was not searching at all for this TED Talk, but happened to stumble upon its mention in an article about techies homeschooling their kids that I was given among my lousy search engine results.  Randomness is it’s own form of creativity, and that’s one of the things that makes certain fractals so delightful. But rather than the computer generating all the wild creativity and fun, it can be much more enjoyable to do it yourself.

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education, Uncategorized

The Benefits of a Separate Page

A small food-for-thought article.

In general, it’s more efficient to try to cram information, details, and images onto one page of paper. This can save paper in the long run and encourages condensing information to make it more or less comprehensive. But those are the only benefits.

On the other hand, there are a number of benefits for just using another sheet of paper.

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education

Making Their Words Your Own

Culture today is very “ego-centric”, or more appropriately, “self-centered”. People are encouraging others not to think for themselves – an act of independence and freedom of expression – but to think about themselves. Culture says that it’s important for a person to have their own uniqueness – to be an island that stands out in the vast ocean – than it is to have a name stamp proclaiming agreement. People hate it when you stand with someone else, as if somehow you’re not supposed to agree with people who came before you or that somehow their expression ought to be exclusively theirs and you have no “right” to touch it or associate yourself with it.

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education, psychology

Effective Teaching

Originally composed May 1, 2019.

I have taught many people over the years, both old and young. Teaching ability seems to come naturally to me. I love the truth and want to convey it, thus teaching can often be a great joy. I prefer tutoring one-on-one over teaching a class for a number of reasons, the least of which is that I prefer intimate settings so that my brain can focus on joust one individual, which is easier to handle than more than one individual. When my brain can focus, I can provide the best teaching I have to offer.

Another reason tutoring is preferred is that it is better for the student. First, a student sees that attention is on them and therefore they are more willing to ask questions, which in turn facilitates learning. When attention is on their needs, they feel more comfortable expressing them. Furthermore, they don’t have the fear of being embarrassed in front of their peers. Such fear can keep them silent, leaving them with unanswered questions and forcing the student to find answers for these questions in other perhaps less effective or less accurate ways.

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