media, videogames

Sky: Children of the Light Review

Keeping my title simple this time. For once I’m on the ball and talking about a game just recently published (i.e. last month instead of 10 years ago).

Continue reading

Advertisements
architecture and interior design, education, psychology

Costless Creativity

Today has been quite inspiring for a number of reasons, but the fun started happening with a really good (albeit 10+ year old) TED Talk by Ken Robinson regarding creativity and education. As you may well know with internet exploration, I was not searching at all for this TED Talk, but happened to stumble upon its mention in an article about techies homeschooling their kids that I was given among my lousy search engine results.  Randomness is it’s own form of creativity, and that’s one of the things that makes certain fractals so delightful. But rather than the computer generating all the wild creativity and fun, it can be much more enjoyable to do it yourself.

Continue reading

global issues, politics

The Line for Government

Assume we have three people: one with a big mouth, one who doesn’t say anything, and one with a gun. Who gets to control the situation? I think it’s fairly obvious that there’s a kind of pecking order here. The big mouth will exert influence over the living status of the silent people, but the person with the gun will get the final word if and when they want it.

Despite this being a very simple example, it applies regardless of scale, albeit the more people that are involved, the more difficult it is for the guys with the guns to enforce their will… at least at a moment’s notice.

Continue reading

media, movies

Enemies and the Dark Side of the Lego Batman Movie

Or “Degradation of Society, Part 2”. (Just found this article on my PC. I wrote it awhile ago and forgot about it.)

The first time I wrote about this film, I spoke about the family as it was addressed in the LEGO Batman Movie. The second time, I compared Joker to Satan. This time, I’ll be talking about the secondary theme of the film: Being an enemy. There’s more talk about Satan and spiritual things here, so skeptics will be… skeptics. haha.

Continue reading

media, movies

Lego Batman and the Offer of Satan

Finally got around to this follow up to a previous article I wrote some time ago. This is a short article. For another take and slightly more in-depth look, see my next article.

Let’s have a “relationship”. What an ambiguous term. Everything has a relationship. Neptune has a relationship with the price of tea in China… albeit a very distant relationship but a relationship nonetheless. (For example: The price of tea in China affects the spending power of the people, which in turn affects the costs of other commodities – locally and abroad – such as iron, which is used for making telescopes, spacecraft, and artificial satellites responsible for analyzing the surface of Neptune.)

Continue reading

education

Making Their Words Your Own

Culture today is very “ego-centric”, or more appropriately, “self-centered”. People are encouraging others not to think for themselves – an act of independence and freedom of expression – but to think about themselves. Culture says that it’s important for a person to have their own uniqueness – to be an island that stands out in the vast ocean – than it is to have a name stamp proclaiming agreement. People hate it when you stand with someone else, as if somehow you’re not supposed to agree with people who came before you or that somehow their expression ought to be exclusively theirs and you have no “right” to touch it or associate yourself with it.

Continue reading

Christianity, global issues, philosophy, psychology, religion and spiritualism

The Most Anticipated Online Interview of 2019 Has Arrived: Peterson – Barron

Audio below.

Bishop Robert Barron is a Catholic ministerial priest who has set out on a quest to show the legitimacy and relevance of authentic Catholic Christian teaching in people’s lives.

Jordan B. Peterson is a clinical psychologist from the University of Toronto.

The two of them have made significant ripples in the water, attracting audiences of millions – both religious and non-religious, Catholic, atheist, Buddhist, Muslim, Protestant, and so on – for their remarkable insights and thought-provoking arguments on the human condition.

Followers of both men have encouraged the two great minds to meet and have a dialogue, so in March of this year, Jordan Peterson interviewed Bishop Barron for his podcast. The result was nearly two hours of polite, fantastic intellectual conversation… and the potential for more.

Continue reading

education, psychology

Effective Teaching

Originally composed May 1, 2019.

I have taught many people over the years, both old and young. Teaching ability seems to come naturally to me. I love the truth and want to convey it, thus teaching can often be a great joy. I prefer tutoring one-on-one over teaching a class for a number of reasons, the least of which is that I prefer intimate settings so that my brain can focus on joust one individual, which is easier to handle than more than one individual. When my brain can focus, I can provide the best teaching I have to offer.

Another reason tutoring is preferred is that it is better for the student. First, a student sees that attention is on them and therefore they are more willing to ask questions, which in turn facilitates learning. When attention is on their needs, they feel more comfortable expressing them. Furthermore, they don’t have the fear of being embarrassed in front of their peers. Such fear can keep them silent, leaving them with unanswered questions and forcing the student to find answers for these questions in other perhaps less effective or less accurate ways.

Continue reading

Christianity, global issues, history, politics, religion and spiritualism

“In God We Trust” – Reflections on Tiananmen Square

June 4, 1989, the communist government of China mercilessly massacred countless people (hundreds, thousands, and even 10,000, according to Sir Alan Donald), including students, residents, and even other soldiers. The events serve as a seemingly timeless testimony to the brutality of authoritarian regimes who fulfill the predictions of Orwell’s 1984 and is remembered in films like Black Night in June by Arther Kent (youtube: watch?v=hA4iKSeijZI ).

Yet the sheer reality of those horrors has escaped the minds of common individuals, even in democratic nations, where policemen argue they need facial recognition software and cameras and the legislative branch of the US government still permits the needless bulk collection of everyone’s internet communications by the NSA, all for “security” (whose?). After the Bolshevik revolution, communism became taboo in the US with the J.E. Hoover FBI squashing resistance for decades. Consequently, it has been rebranded as “social reform” and socialist policies (F.D.R., J.F.K., L.B.J. and such presidents). It’s easy to argue for idealistic systems, but people forget that when anything is put in practice, the one variable causing all of the problems hasn’t been fixed: the wickedness of a human. That brings us to an interesting point.

Standing and watching the real events take place were three “gods”. The first was the communist state, the self-proclaimed god that dictated the lives of the people. The second was the “Goddess of Democracy”, a statue constructed by the students of the protest (which survived, or perhaps as a replica). The third was the real God.

Each of these “gods” was in some way part of the events, and each one called out for action.

Continue reading