4500 Already?

As of today, this blog has been viewed 4501 times. Not too long ago, I had a post celebrating reaching 4000 views.

That’s quite a large number, but it seems the next thousand is coming soon – probably sooner than I will reach 100 posts. I try to think of useful things, so I’m rather slow at writing. This dramatic shift in stats was noticeable. Stats show most people who view my blog are looking for how to change the VLC album art, resulting in my post on that being viewed 131 times this week – almost exactly ten times the amount people who viewed my once-popular SAO post (13) – and my blog has had 20 or more views a day since the 12th of April.

Okay, enough with the stats. What’s next? A few things in the works – since I’ve been doing a bit of programming, my next few posts may be on that. I have no idea what kinds of people read this blog, so expect randomness.

Posted humor has been deleted for conservation efforts. Drive safely.

Time for some reflection.

When I began blogging a year and a half ago, I didn’t think I’d care about the stats – as in, look at them frequently. Maybe it’s just the fact that WordPress puts them on your dashboard and gives you so many did I start to think about these otherwise insignificant numbers. Why do I care that this blog is being viewed multiple times? While it might seem depressing if only 1 person bothered to ever read what you had to say, the fact is, whenever you engage someone in a conversation, they are probably the only person who is going to hear those words, whether they are profound or otherwise. And yet with books, articles, etc., for some people, it might not be worth writing an article if only one person is ever going to read what they had to say. But to me, it seems fine. Heck, if ten people read it over the course of the articles tiny time of recognition on the vast internet, that’s alot more people who hear those words than I usually get in an conversation.

You have to be careful about what you say that. It’ll all come back eventually. Or at least some of it will. Alot of it will be ignored. Alot of it people will skip over because they think it’s unimportant.

Eventually, if your blog (assuming you have one) ever become super popular and you start getting hundreds of views a day, you may eventually stop caring about the sheer number of readers. You may begin to think – and rightly so – that some articles are viewed, not because they were attractive articles, but because a large enough audience has been drawn to your blog for people to randomly click on things, hoping for something to be interesting. What then? How do you view your blog’s popularity? Maybe it was never important to begin with and stayed that way. I’d like to think most people write their blogs with the intention of sharing information that might be valuable to someone else, so then they would be pleased that people are acquiring that information. That’s not always the case, and many personal blogs are either popular because it’s some star, band, or company, or are left in the shadows of the internet and eventually abandoned from lack of interest on the part of the writer.

One such personal blog I used to read was an Australian’s blog. The writer had some interesting posts every once in awhile. Given that he posted almost twice a week or more, he had thousands of posts (usually very short). What happened? Well, I think he got tired of his audience being smarter than him, so he disabled comments for everything. Since the info he presented could be easily found on a tech article, the only reason to view his blog might be to ask him a question about it or discuss it with him. Everything else he had was about the same – really short, so more info could be found elsewhere. He never posted reviews of anime unless it was the episode-by-episode thing – WAY too much information for the person just considering watching the show (who doesn’t want spoilers). Once again, without being able to comment, no discussion occurred. I think his readership might be evaporating, but there’s no way I can tell.

Every now and again, I think about that blogger and wonder why he writes the amount that he does when his content is so… little. I guess some people like to talk alot. There’s Twitter for people who have to spit out every single line (not to say it isn’t used for other things). At the same rate, I think people want to share their lives with each other. If they don’t have a direct audience to do it with, they shout it out to the internet. The net then becomes a vent, and since people are the content creators, alot of what you may read is just people venting to a large audience. By “vent” I’m not necessarily referring to people being angry or obnoxious. There’s that too. But I’m particularly referring to the fact that people want to talk. And the more people listen to you or read what you have to say, the better you might feel because people took the time to, at the very least, glance at what you had written. Hence, the designers of WordPress included statistics in this site’s features.

In conclusion, whether you care about site stats or not, I’m sure you’ll admit that you peek at them every once in awhile.

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About chronologicaldot

Just a Christ-centered, train-loving, computer geek.
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